Honey mustard dressing

The Minotaur's honey-mustard dressing à la maison

Peter Flynn

Honey mustard dressing

The joint annual conference of the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing and the Association for Computing in the Humanities (now the Digital Humanities Conference) isn’t perhaps the first place you’d look for recipes, but Debbie Everhart and Martin Irvine of the Labyrinth Project invited Elaine, myself, and a few others for dinner after the meeting in Georgetown DC in 1993, and produced this dressing. Martin was good enough to mail me the recipe later.

Your support for our advertisers helps cover the cost of hosting, research, and maintenance of this site


The original made enough for five hungry academics (with plenty of fresh crusty bread) but I have given an alternative with a much smaller quantity and slightly different ingredients.


Ingredients

Original

  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar [red wine vinegar will do, but will taste more acidic, so replace 2 tbsp with water]
  • 3 tbsp Dijon mustard [Grey Poupon Country Dijon is good here]
  • 3 tbsp honey [the crystallised, or ‘set’ version is better than the transparent or liquid one]
  • 2 cloves garlic | crushed
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • ½ cup olive oil

Alternative

  • 1 dsp smooth mustard
  • 1 dsp seedy mustard
  • 1 dsp honey
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp mixed ground pepper [eg pink and black]
  • 1 tbsp rapeseed oil
  • 1 tbsp cider vinegar

Method

Original

  1. Place the balsamic vinegar in the mixing bowl or salad dressing shaker (you can use a small blender or food processor: this is not an exact science) with the crushed or pressed garlic, the Dijon mustard and the honey (see tip).

  2. Add the salt and ground pepper.

  3. Blend all the ingredients except the olive oil.

  4. Add the olive oil and blend all the ingredients together.


Alternative

  1. Mix the smooth mustard, seedy mustard, and honey in a bowl.

  2. Add the salt and mixed ground pepper and mix well.

  3. Add the rapeseed oil and cider vinegar and whisk thoroughly.


Serving

  • Martin wishes you bon appetit!


A food processor or blender can be used for just about 30 seconds; that will produce very smooth, well blended results. Hand blending/mixing will also work just fine, but will take a minute or two to get everything creamy and well-blended.


Your support for our advertisers helps cover the cost of hosting, research, and maintenance of this site